Birmingham city centre fountains dyed red by Palestine Action group

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Palestine Action protestors have dyed fountains red at Chamberlain Memorial, the Floozie in the Jacuzzi in Victoria Square and Chamberlain Memorial in Chamberlain Square, Birmingham

Fountains in Birmingham city centre have been dyed red today (May 15) by the Palestine Action group.

In a post on social media, the protest group said the fountains in Chamberlain Square and Victoria Square were dyed red to symbolise 76 years since the ‘Nakba’ began and Britian’s involvement in the conflict. The date, May 15, commemorates the events which caused Palestinians to lose their homes and become refugees.

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The protestors dyed fountains red in Chamberlain Memorial, the Floozie in the Jacuzzi in Victoria Square and at Chamberlain Memorial in Chamberlain Square.

Other protests from the group have also taken place across the country today and in recent days.

Chamberlain Memorial  in Birmingham, May 15Chamberlain Memorial  in Birmingham, May 15
Chamberlain Memorial in Birmingham, May 15

The incident comes after the University of Birmingham issued legal warnings to students staging a pro-Palestinian protest camp on campus. This marks the first time a UK university has taken such action.

Inspired by similar US protests, these students set up camp, despite warnings that they might face legal consequences if they don't disperse.

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The Floozie in the Jacuzzi in Birmingham, May 15The Floozie in the Jacuzzi in Birmingham, May 15
The Floozie in the Jacuzzi in Birmingham, May 15

Protesters argue that they're acting lawfully, demanding financial transparency from the university and an end to research partnerships with Israeli institutions. "This is our campus, and we intend to be here peacefully and legally," one said.

Despite the university's warnings, the protest camp, which has grown to around 40 tents, remains firmly in place.

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